May 212013
 

© Paul Mozell

I recently taught a workshop on wildflower photography and demonstrated the use of extension tubes. Fotodiox has a very inexpensive solution in this category that is worth checking out if you are a Canon shooter. Continue reading »

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May 212013
 

Clouds Over Ipwich Bay

Sometimes I feel as though I’ve been conditioned by the great late god of Kodachrome to seek out and photograph perfect blue skies. But here over Ipswich Bay in Massachusetts one evening, as darkening clouds block the setting sun, I feel liberated for a moment from the urge to photograph cobalt blue and puffy-white cumulus clouds. Seeing these shades of grey, tan and pale yellow over the glistening bay I feel freer than before.

If you are looking for a sense of renewal in your landscape photographs, try responding to the darkness.

Click here to see a larger version of this photograph. It is available as a collectable fine art print and as a licensed stock image for commercial use.

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Apr 092013
 

© Paul Mozell

I must have been 12 or 13 years old when my father, a professional cinematographer and still photographer, gave me my first light meter, a General Electric.  In these days of 36 megapixel DSLRs it may be useful to remember the tools we had available in the 1960’s.

I still have this meter and it works! You can flip open a cover on the top and take a reflected light reading. Or, you can snap off the entire top of the unit and take an incident light reading—the light striking the subject. It’s a simple matter to transfer the reading from the dial to the calculator to get your f-stop and shutter speeds. I used the meter for many years with a twin lens Rolleicord, later a Rolleiflex, and a Kodak Retina II 35mm rangefinder camera. I upgraded to a Weston light meter and later a Gossen. All to support black & white photography.

General Electric photographic light meter

General Electric photographic light meter

If anyone knows the date of manufacture of this meter please comment below. I suspect it was the late 40’s or 50’s.

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Jan 082013
 

© Paul Mozell 2013

I hear this question…or this whine… very often: “Where are the photo files I just transferred from my camera?” or, “Where are the files from last Christmas?” or, “Where are all my photographs?” Here are a few pointers for keeping track of your irreplaceable images.

Huntington Ravine, White Mountain National Forest, NH

Huntington Ravine, White Mountain National Forest, NH

  1. Check the default settings of the software you are using to offload files from your card reader or directly from the camera. Are the files going to the Pictures or My Pictures folder? On Mac use the Finder, on Windows use Windows Explorer to see if you have more than one Pictures folder. Continue reading »
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Nov 202012
 

© Paul Mozell
A friend who manages a farmers market referred a photographer to me who is thinking about renting a space and selling some photographs. Although I have never made this sort of commitment myself, I have done a lot of research. Here is what I shared with that photographer—everything I can think of about successful selling in this kind of environment

Indoor fountains with lasers and synced music.

  • Do a thorough analysis of your costs, including the time you put into preparing, shipping, mounting, and packaging your work. Only then can you decide how to price your work. This holds true for any photographic business venture.
  • Study the competition’s pricing. I run into a lot of photographers and artists who are selling their work at prices that seem far too low.
  • Decide if you want to sell bare prints (shrink-wrapped, or bagged, with a backing board included), matted and mounted; or; matted, mounted, and framed.
  • Figure out what you are going to do with your excess inventory. Do you have the space to store the product in your home? I think you’ll find out very soon that you can’t sell at just one arts and crafts event. It’s just not worth the trouble and the expense. But if you do want to jump in, plan on doing 4, 6, or 10 shows per season. That’s how you’ll make some real money.
  • This is a business. Don’t do it just to feel good – although I hope you will! Continue reading »
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Sep 262012
 

© Paul Mozell 2012

Do you ever find yourself taking the same photographs again and again? Are you strolling through your favorite downtown neighborhood hoping to be struck by a lightning bolt of inspiration? Are you gliding through a vacation paradise without raising your camera to your eye? This happens to everyone in a creative field and it strikes the rich and famous, the middle-of-the-roaders, and quiet amateurs. To restart your creative engine consider trying one or more of the following:

  1. Visit an art museum, and after roaming the obvious choice of photography galleries, visit European Art and study the portrait lighting of the Dutch Masters. Check out the European, Asian, and American landscapes of the 18th and 19th centuries. And, be sure to open your mind to Abstract Impressionism, Pop Art, Op Art,  and Cubism. Finally, be amazed by the large three-dimensional installation pieces. For each artwork that catches your eye try to answer the questions: “How does this work make me feel?”, “What was the artist hoping to communicate to the viewer—if anything?”, and “Could I be as seemingly uninhibited as these artists?” The answer to the last question should be, “yes”.
  2. Go to your local bookstore or library and explore the art and photography books. Get inspired!
  3. Post your work Continue reading »
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Jun 022012
 

This image was inspired by Japanese watercolor, or brush and ink landscapes. I used the multiple exposure feature in my Nikon to take 3 superimposed images, each at a different focal length with the same 18-70mm lens. In the days of film achieving this effect was more difficult and less predictable. If your camera body did not have a multiple exposure button you had to press the film-rewind button on the bottom of the camera while flipping the film advance lever with your thumb. This re-cocked the shutter, and if you were lucky, the film stayed in place and didn’t jump a sprocket or two.

This photograph is available as an open-edition fine art print or a licensed stock image for commercial use. Click in the image for a larger view and ordering options. Your comments are also welcome here!

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Apr 182012
 

While not exactly Eadweard Muybridge — famous for his stop-motion photographs of horses and men —nor Harold Edgarton—known for his accomplishments with stroboscopic photography—I had an urge to record my daughter’s running technique. You can do this too. Continue reading »

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Jan 312012
 

© Paul Mozell  — Although I live in New England, I am often surprised by the intensity of the complaints about winter weather. It’s not that I want to keep folks from emigrating to Florida. Rather, knowing how to stay comfortably safe and warm is much easier than most people think.  Heat management, and dressing correctly, is the key to getting great photographs of the winter landscape and cold weather sports and activities.

Mushing on Chocorua Lake, New Hampshire © Paul Mozell

Continue reading »

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Jan 112012
 

© Paul Mozell

Induro 313 alloy tripod

The tripod is still one of the most essential, universal, and adaptable tools for photographers of all ability levels. The tripod may be the most overlooked accessory among photographers just starting out. This applies to users of small point-and-shoot models and bulkier DSLRs. The tripod helps you fix the position of your camera, make incremental adjustments to its position, communicate  easily with portrait subjects, and create panoramic images. Although image stabilization technology in today’s cameras does make it easier to shoot at slower shutter speeds, the low-tech tripod is still essential. Continue reading »

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Nov 182011
 

Photographers and fine art professionals share tips for succeeding in fine art photography.

To help photographers establish and grow their fine art photography sales, we’ve assembled 12 interviews with photographers, gallery owners, online curators and consultants, all with inspiring opinions and insights about what’s working and not working in their unique approaches to succeeding in selling fine art photography. Continue reading »

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Jul 122011
 

© Paul Mozell 2011

Focal Press, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc., has published a number of books by pro photographers, about photography, within the past year. These slim volumes will appeal to both new and experienced shooters. Thumbing through the stack of books for the first time, I was impressed with the quality of graphic design as well as the attention to detail from page to page. The books are printed on heavy stock, and both monochrome and color images really pop. Even the software screen captures are clearly visible.  The Focus On series parses the most important teaching points of feature-rich software products to a very manageable level. Volumes in the Field Guide series are compact enough (4.5 x 6 inches) to toss in a camera backpack for reference or inspiration when photographing on location. Continue reading »

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